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Tech Tubeless set up

Winston Leg-Thigh

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Mar 31, 2015
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I'm planning on going tubeless on my CX/gravel/all-road bike in the next few weeks. The rims on the stock wheels (Alex) are tubeless ready and I've got a pair of 35mm G-Ones ready to go, so any recommendations for tubeless valves, rim tape, sealant and anchovies - anything people have used that works well or is best swerved - would be much appreciated.
 

bloaker

Sincerely A Dick
Nov 14, 2011
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I run either Stans or WTB tape.
I have had excellent experiences with Stans valves as well as I9 valves.
American Classic valves... not so much. I have replaced the two sets I tried with stans and the wheels went from Chronic leaking to no issues at all.
I typically run Stans sealant, but have used Schwable - I don't feel either is better.
I run G-Ones on my Fargo and love them!
 

kruucks

Speeding Up
Feb 3, 2019
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running everything from Stans for me. Just a remember to spin your wheels every now and then if you're not going to be riding your bike every day.

also, if you're having problems getting the bead to seat, try running them with tubes for a few days and try again.
 

bloaker

Sincerely A Dick
Nov 14, 2011
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I have set up roughly 30 sets (so 60 wheels) tubeless. It is not hard.
1) Clean the rim and ensure there is no debris on it.
2) Start your tape several cm from the valve stem hole and wrap toward the hole. Pull the tape tight as you put on the rim. Air bubbles are not a big deal, but keep them to a minimum. Overlap the tape as you pass the valve stem hole again. A few cm after the hole, cut the tape. - the hardest part is now done.
3) IMPORTANT PART HERE - make a small hole to push your valve stem through. If you use an exacto knife or something and the slot is just a bit too big... you will potentially have problems down the road. I use a nail and just pop it thought the middle. It is smaller than the stem.
4) Push the valve stem though and put the nut on the backside. Ensure it is tight enough for the rubber to seal to the time tape.

Have had a few issues in the past - I do things a little different at this point....
5) Mount your tires completely and air it up to seal the bead. - This tests your take and valve job prior to putting sealant in. If there is an issue, it should be obvious right away. You can take the tire off and fix the issue prior to having the messy sealant involved. If it seats and you are happy.... continue.
6) Break the bead on one side and add your sealant.
7) Turn the wheel 180 degrees and reat the tire
8) Air it up and spin the wheel. Any small leaks should be sealed relatively quick by the sealant.

This entire process once you are familiar should take about 15-25 minutes a wheel.
I strongly recommend doing it yourself. You will need to top off fluid in the future. You may need to pop a tube in in the future and understanding all you need to do is helpful. You will need new tires at some point in the future... If you think knowing how to change a tire is important, so is this.
 

Karl

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Feb 7, 2011
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Thanks for that, Bloaker. I'm still using tubes but I'm tubeless curious. Good info if I take the plunge.

One question. I was riding with someone last summer who had run tubeless, then put a tube back in for some reason. He flatted and the old sealant had hardened so hard on the tire bead that neither of us could get a tire lever under the bead to change the tire. Is this something that happens much with sealant? If it does happen, what can you do to get the tire off?
 

bloaker

Sincerely A Dick
Nov 14, 2011
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I have never not been able to get a tire off, but I have had sealant make it harder.
There is defintely "maintenance" that needs to be done with sealant. When you do an annual clean up of your bikes, take the tires off, wipe the insides out and the rim. Get them all clean and sexy, remount with new sealant. This prevents it from getting to the point you described.

The upside... This past week I was in Kamakura, I heard the air coming out from a puncture. I found the spot, held the bike so the sealant would puddle around the hole. Rocked the tire back and forth. 20 second later, tire was sealed and off I went. Never even took the wheel out of the fork.
 

Karl

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Feb 7, 2011
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From the perspective of a guy that still uses tubes, tubeless sounds great once they're up and running, but the faff-factor seems really high. It's put me off so far, but next bike, probably will go with them.
 

kruucks

Speeding Up
Feb 3, 2019
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Thanks for that, Bloaker. I'm still using tubes but I'm tubeless curious. Good info if I take the plunge.

One question. I was riding with someone last summer who had run tubeless, then put a tube back in for some reason. He flatted and the old sealant had hardened so hard on the tire bead that neither of us could get a tire lever under the bead to change the tire. Is this something that happens much with sealant? If it does happen, what can you do to get the tire off?
Something else to keep in mind: every couple months you'll need to top off the sealant in your tires. Some will slowly leak out over time with tiny punctures and some will dry out and harden.
 

bloaker

Sincerely A Dick
Nov 14, 2011
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I run tubes in my road bike - but everything else is tubeless.
My gravel bike (Vassago) and adventure bike (Fargo) run lower pressures and are ridden off road, so more prone to punctures... - so they are tubeless.
If/When I need new tires on the Ritchey, I will look into going tubeless.
 

kiwisimon

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Dec 14, 2006
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I run 3m tape on the rims,


IRC sealant
https://ircbike.jp/product-list/goods/product-list-1917/
IRC tires
and American classic valves
 
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Winston Leg-Thigh

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Mar 31, 2015
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@bloaker - great info - thanks. I'm looking forward to giving the G-Ones a whirl. The bike came with X-Ones (non-tubeless) and I've been really impressed with them so hopefully the G-Ones will be as good if not better.
@kruucks - thanks for the info - looks like I'll be going with Stans.

@Tanki - I'll let you know how it goes...
 

leicaman

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Sep 20, 2012
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I run 3m tape on the rims, https://www.3mcompany.jp/3M/ja_JP/c...テープ-8898/?N=5002385+8711017+3293242202&rt=rud
IRC sealant
https://ircbike.jp/product-list/goods/product-list-1917/
IRC tires
and American classic valves
I use 3M tape, too. Never had a problem with it. Btw, that link doesn’t work for me. Not sure if others can see it or not.
 

Winston Leg-Thigh

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Mar 31, 2015
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@kiwisimon - thanks for the links. That 3m tape looks much cheaper than a lot of the alternatives. I was looking at the IRC sealant - think I read it's made by Stans. I've been really impressed with the IRC Marbella tyre I'm running on the front of one of my bikes. I'll definitely be getting one for the back when the gravel king that's on there now needs replacing.
 

bloaker

Sincerely A Dick
Nov 14, 2011
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I have not used the 3m tape - so I cannot comment on it specifically - It may be perfect!

But two reasons I have stuck with Stans and WTB - it comes off super clean with almost no residue and they weigh almost nothing.
I know guys who has used Gorilla Tape and some even Duct Tape. It is commonly called "Ghetto Tubeless" - it works just fine... until it doesn't. Then expect hours to just try and get off the old tape then the horrible residue. Not to mention the added weight.
 

kiwisimon

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@kiwisimon I've been really impressed with the IRC Marbella tyre I'm running on the front of one of my bikes. I'll definitely be getting one for the back when the gravel king that's on there now needs replacing.
Same here, I'm a big fan of IRC tires, they aren't the most durable but for grip and feel, A+. They are also a Japanese company so I don't mind paying a bit more.
I have not used the 3m tape - so I cannot comment on it specifically - It may be perfect!
I've had no trouble with it. I re-wrap my wheels when I put on new tires. It comes of really easily and then I just use soapy water to wash down the rims. I've found double wrapping and then very hot metal (a soldering iron or screwdriver) to melt a clean valve hole opening woks great.
 

kruucks

Speeding Up
Feb 3, 2019
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I have not used the 3m tape - so I cannot comment on it specifically - It may be perfect!

But two reasons I have stuck with Stans and WTB - it comes off super clean with almost no residue and they weigh almost nothing.
I know guys who has used Gorilla Tape and some even Duct Tape. It is commonly called "Ghetto Tubeless" - it works just fine... until it doesn't. Then expect hours to just try and get off the old tape then the horrible residue. Not to mention the added weight.
the other issue with gorilla tape is that it is porous. sealant will leak into the rim and start to eat at the spokes/nipples.
 

leicaman

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The 3M tape isnt hard to get off the rims, unlike gorilla tape. If you want to search for it on Amazon just type in 3M 8898.
 
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